When will Detroit stop stifling competition?

I’m not sure what got me to thinking about it but I was browsing the net looking for information on the Tucker. Remember the tucker? Only 51 were ever made and they were shut down because of a lawsuit brought by the government (and pushed for by the big three). The car was way ahead of it’s time. Well, they (the big three) have done it again.

While browsing, I happened on a website called “There He Is.com” and in a recent article, they said:  “While the Big 3 Automakers are begging for the Federal Government to save them from their own shitty business decisions, they are also doing their best to hide innovations by any other US Automaker. Take for example, the AFS Trinity XH-150 Extreme Hybrid. It is a concept Hybrid SUV that gets 150 MPG. (see video below)  But because none of the big 3 invented it, they are using their influence to prevent people from finding out. How?” Read the article here.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v09_uTp08zg]

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6 Comments

  • Rich T

    January 3, 2010

    With referene to: ‘Well, they (the big three) have done it again’ stated above – I belive you should tell the whole story of how the http://afstrinity.com/faq.htm web site talks about how they calculate the ‘150 mpg’ claim. It is not how you and I would calculate the miles per gallen. They need to include overnight recharges to result in the 150mpg claim. I can understand why they (big 3 or organizers) asked them to not claim since it is not straight forward on how they come up with it.

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      January 3, 2010

      Excellent point, Rich. Thanks for pointing that out. I pulled the following information from the site:

      Why do you call this a 150mpg car if it is mostly electric? Does it really get 150 miles per gallon?
      When discussing plug-in hybrid cars, mpg figures require deeper explanation. We have calculated gasoline mileage by using average American driving patterns estimated by the U.S. Department of Transportation and simulating the EPA combined urban/highway driving cycle of the host vehicle operating only with its conventional hybrid drive train. In 2003, the U.S. Department of Transportation reported that 78% of Americans drive less than 40 miles a day. On those days, drivers of Extreme Hybrids will need no gasoline at all — even driving an SUV. Assuming that someone drives 40 miles a day, 6 days a week and 80 miles on one weekend day, total weekly distance traveled will be 320 miles. The first 280 miles are electric. The next 40 miles, on one weekend day, will use gas alone. Even if the car, while running only on gas on day 7, were to get only 20 mpg because the car were heavily laden and the driver has a “lead foot,” that would still mean the driver will use just a little more than two gallons of gasoline for the week. Although this translates into 160 MPG, we use a more conservative 150 MPG to take into account that mileage will vary depending on where and how a car is driven, but we are comfortable that 150 miles per gallon of gasoline is a good number for 78% of American drivers driving the way most Americans drive.

      Will the electric range of the batteries ever be more or less than 40 miles?
      Yes, driving patterns, weather conditions, and a host of other factors will affect the range of the batteries. Generally speaking, fuel economy for a plugin hybrid is highly dependent on three factors: (1) how far the car can travel per day using electricity alone in combined urban/highway driving (in the case of the XH150 it is over 40 miles); (2) how far the car will travel each week beyond 280 miles: and (3) what the fuel consumption of the car will be when operated only on gas. Why do you call this a 150mpg car if it is mostly electric? Does it really get 150 miles per gallon? When discussing plug-in hybrid cars, mpg figures require deeper explanation. We have calculated gasoline mileage by using average American driving patterns estimated by the U.S. Department of Transportation and simulating the EPA combined urban/highway driving cycle of the host vehicle operating only with its conventional hybrid drive train. In 2003, the U.S. Department of Transportation reported that 78% of Americans drive less than 40 miles a day. On those days, drivers of Extreme Hybrids will need no gasoline at all — even driving an SUV. Assuming that someone drives 40 miles a day, 6 days a week and 80 miles on one weekend day, total weekly distance traveled will be 320 miles. The first 280 miles are electric. The next 40 miles, on one weekend day, will use gas alone. Even if the car, while running only on gas on day 7, were to get only 20 mpg because the car were heavily laden and the driver has a “lead foot,” that would still mean the driver will use just a little more than two gallons of gasoline for the week. Although this translates into 160 MPG, we use a more conservative 150 MPG to take into account that mileage will vary depending on where and how a car is driven, but we are comfortable that 150 miles per gallon of gasoline is a good number for 78% of American drivers driving the way most Americans drive.

      Will the electric range of the batteries ever be more or less than 40 miles? Yes, driving patterns, weather conditions, and a host of other factors will affect the range of the batteries. Generally speaking, fuel economy for a plugin hybrid is highly dependent on three factors: (1) how far the car can travel per day using electricity alone in combined urban/highway driving (in the case of the XH150 it is over 40 miles); (2) how far the car will travel each week beyond 280 miles: and (3) what the fuel consumption of the car will be when operated only on gas.

      Reply
  • Rich T

    January 3, 2010

    With referene to: ‘Well, they (the big three) have done it again’ stated above – I belive you should tell the whole story of how the http://afstrinity.com/faq.htm web site talks about how they calculate the ‘150 mpg’ claim. It is not how you and I would calculate the miles per gallen. They need to include overnight recharges to result in the 150mpg claim. I can understand why they (big 3 or organizers) asked them to not claim since it is not straight forward on how they come up with it.

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      January 3, 2010

      Excellent point, Rich. Thanks for pointing that out. I pulled the following information from the site:

      Why do you call this a 150mpg car if it is mostly electric? Does it really get 150 miles per gallon?
      When discussing plug-in hybrid cars, mpg figures require deeper explanation. We have calculated gasoline mileage by using average American driving patterns estimated by the U.S. Department of Transportation and simulating the EPA combined urban/highway driving cycle of the host vehicle operating only with its conventional hybrid drive train. In 2003, the U.S. Department of Transportation reported that 78% of Americans drive less than 40 miles a day. On those days, drivers of Extreme Hybrids will need no gasoline at all — even driving an SUV. Assuming that someone drives 40 miles a day, 6 days a week and 80 miles on one weekend day, total weekly distance traveled will be 320 miles. The first 280 miles are electric. The next 40 miles, on one weekend day, will use gas alone. Even if the car, while running only on gas on day 7, were to get only 20 mpg because the car were heavily laden and the driver has a “lead foot,” that would still mean the driver will use just a little more than two gallons of gasoline for the week. Although this translates into 160 MPG, we use a more conservative 150 MPG to take into account that mileage will vary depending on where and how a car is driven, but we are comfortable that 150 miles per gallon of gasoline is a good number for 78% of American drivers driving the way most Americans drive.

      Will the electric range of the batteries ever be more or less than 40 miles?
      Yes, driving patterns, weather conditions, and a host of other factors will affect the range of the batteries. Generally speaking, fuel economy for a plugin hybrid is highly dependent on three factors: (1) how far the car can travel per day using electricity alone in combined urban/highway driving (in the case of the XH150 it is over 40 miles); (2) how far the car will travel each week beyond 280 miles: and (3) what the fuel consumption of the car will be when operated only on gas. Why do you call this a 150mpg car if it is mostly electric? Does it really get 150 miles per gallon? When discussing plug-in hybrid cars, mpg figures require deeper explanation. We have calculated gasoline mileage by using average American driving patterns estimated by the U.S. Department of Transportation and simulating the EPA combined urban/highway driving cycle of the host vehicle operating only with its conventional hybrid drive train. In 2003, the U.S. Department of Transportation reported that 78% of Americans drive less than 40 miles a day. On those days, drivers of Extreme Hybrids will need no gasoline at all — even driving an SUV. Assuming that someone drives 40 miles a day, 6 days a week and 80 miles on one weekend day, total weekly distance traveled will be 320 miles. The first 280 miles are electric. The next 40 miles, on one weekend day, will use gas alone. Even if the car, while running only on gas on day 7, were to get only 20 mpg because the car were heavily laden and the driver has a “lead foot,” that would still mean the driver will use just a little more than two gallons of gasoline for the week. Although this translates into 160 MPG, we use a more conservative 150 MPG to take into account that mileage will vary depending on where and how a car is driven, but we are comfortable that 150 miles per gallon of gasoline is a good number for 78% of American drivers driving the way most Americans drive.

      Will the electric range of the batteries ever be more or less than 40 miles? Yes, driving patterns, weather conditions, and a host of other factors will affect the range of the batteries. Generally speaking, fuel economy for a plugin hybrid is highly dependent on three factors: (1) how far the car can travel per day using electricity alone in combined urban/highway driving (in the case of the XH150 it is over 40 miles); (2) how far the car will travel each week beyond 280 miles: and (3) what the fuel consumption of the car will be when operated only on gas.

      Reply
  • Brian Turner

    October 13, 2011

    Hi, My name is Brian and I’d like to speak with you about your blog, please email me at your earliest convenience.

    Reply
  • Brian Turner

    October 13, 2011

    Hi, My name is Brian and I’d like to speak with you about your blog, please email me at your earliest convenience.

    Reply

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